Tag Archives: crisis

Bad News? Awesome!

We often take the wrong things too seriously. At the end of the year most of us can look back on 12 months of corporate “fire drills” and other mini crises and recognize that none of them had lasting significance. Yet while in the midst of these crises I often see my clients getting worked up and stressing out.

Why?

So what if the sale got blown? So what if senior management wants a report on their desk in three hours? So what if they then decide to sit on the report for six weeks doing nothing? So what if the materials didn’t arrive? So what if the meeting got cancelled?

So what?

These things seem significant in the moment, but usually, looking back after time has passed we can recognize them for what they are – speed bumps of little consequence. And in fact, there’s no reason we can’t treat them as such in the moment.

The next time you are confronted with a mini crisis, say in your most enthusiastic voice, “Wow! This is awesome! Here’s why . . .”

After you’ve rattled off three reasons (and there are always reasons if you are creative) you can begin to address the fire drill with eager calm rather than stressed frenzy.

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Market Opportunities 3

With the market causing heartburn the world over, I’d like to take a moment to revisit three blog posts from the past year to remind all of us how to view the setbacks of today. (See post 1 and post 2.)

The Opportunity Is Now

Originally posted on August 16, 2010

When the employment numbers finally do pick up and gather steam, many employers and employees will have regrets.

Employers will regret how they treated their employees during the downturn. They will wish they had celebrated more wherever they could and expressed appreciation more often. They will wish they had spent more time rallying the troops and helping them develop new skills. They will wish these things as they see frustrated employees leave in droves because they finally can.

Employees will regret how they acted during the downturn as well. They will see the people who rose to the occasion during the downturn get the promotions when budgets return. They will wish they had been the ones who had been most positive, most eager to take on the tough assignments after colleagues were laid off. They will wish they had spent more time building their skills during the downturn so they could be more upwardly mobile in the upswing.

Don’t wait for the numbers to change. The time of opportunity is now.

Market Opportunities 2

With the market causing heartburn the world over, I’d like to take a moment to revisit three blog posts from the past year to remind all of us how to view the setbacks of today. (See post 1.)

Crisis Lessons

Originally posted on April 1, 2011

When the crisis hits, remember this. People are watching.

Your peers, manager, and direct reports. Your customers and vendors. Your family. Your kids.

More than any other moment in any of these relationships, your actions in a crisis will be remembered. They will teach the people around you how to face challenges. And they will teach them how to view you.

So next time a crisis hits, remember it is the greatest teaching moment you will ever have.

Market Opportunities 1

With the market causing heartburn the world over, I’d like to take a moment to revisit three blog posts from the past year to remind all of us how to view the setbacks of today.

Promotion Time

Originally posted on March 2, 2011

Are times tough in your organization? Budget cuts? Low or no bonuses? Responsibilities increasing for pay that stays the same?

Do you know what happens when bosses deliver bad news?

Promotions are determined.

They aren’t given. But promotion decisions are made when times are toughest. It may take many months for those decisions to be implemented. But it’s during those bad times that bosses recognize the biggest differences among their employees – the ones who need to be carried and the ones who can step up and carry others through tough times.

It’s hard to stand out during good times. Everyone performs well then.

But when the boss delivers terrible news? That’s when the promotion decisions are made.

Time to step up.

Crisis Lessons

When the crisis hits, remember this. People are watching.

Your peers, manager, and direct reports. Your customers and vendors. Your family. Your kids.

More than any other moment in any of these relationships, your actions in a crisis will be remembered. They will teach the people around you how to face challenges. And they will teach them how to view you.

So next time a crisis hits, remember it is the greatest teaching moment you will ever have.