Tag Archives: Jill Bolte Taylor

Strokes of Insight #5

Jill Bolte Taylor’s book, My Stroke of Insight, is brilliant, fascinating, enthralling, and filled with insights to help anyone find greater peace and compassion in their lives. The next few blogs will share some of the insights I gained from this story about a brain scientist experiencing and recovering from a stroke.

Insight #5 – You can train your brain.

“Before the stroke, I believed I was a product of this brain and that I had minimal say about how I felt or what I thought. Since the hemorrhage, my eyes have been opened to how much choice I actually have about what goes on between my ears.”

Every day your brain continues to develop, to reinforce old patterns and/or to establish new ones.

What do you do on a daily basis to train your brain to engage in healthy patterns?

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Strokes of Insight #4

Jill Bolte Taylor’s book, My Stroke of Insight, is brilliant, fascinating, enthralling, and filled with insights to help anyone find greater peace and compassion in their lives. The next few blogs will share some of the insights I gained from this story about a brain scientist experiencing and recovering from a stroke.

Insight #4 – Everyone needs cheering.

Two of the things Jill Bolte Taylor describes needing most in her recovery were for, “people to treat me as though I would recover completely,” and constant reinforcement for the successes along the way. She desperately needed to feel that others had faith in her and that she was making progress.

She is not alone.

We all need to feel this faith from people around us. We can all give it to the people around us.

Today and every day you can tell the people around you how much you believe in them. And you can choose to look for what is going right. Identify successes and express appreciation for them.

Strokes of Insight #3

Jill Bolte Taylor’s book, My Stroke of Insight, is brilliant, fascinating, enthralling, and filled with insights to help anyone find greater peace and compassion in their lives. The next few blogs will share some of the insights I gained from this story about a brain scientist experiencing and recovering from a stroke.

Insight #3 – Decisions need to be remade.

There are some decisions we need to make millions of times in our lives. For Jill Bolte Taylor it was the decision to put forth the effort to recover from her stroke. Every time she awoke it would have been easier for her to rest, relax, and avoid the work of recovery. She had to decide to try over and over and over again.

You have many similar decisions that demand to be made constantly.

  • To build a strong marriage
  • To be a good parent
  • To be a caring leader
  • To live your values
  • To stand up for what you believe
  • To trust
  • To be honest
  • To put forth your best effort

What are the most important decisions you have to make repeatedly every day of your life?

Strokes of Insight #2

Jill Bolte Taylor’s book, My Stroke of Insight, is brilliant, fascinating, enthralling, and filled with insights to help anyone find greater peace and compassion in their lives. The next few blogs will share some of the insights I gained from this story about a brain scientist experiencing and recovering from a stroke.

Insight #2 – Energy matters.

We are all filled with it, positive and/or negative. We give to and feed off the energy of the people around us.

Every interaction is an opportunity to give people positive or negative energy.

Every person you invite into your life will energize or drain you. It’s important to choose wisely.

Strokes of Insight #1

Jill Bolte Taylor’s book, My Stroke of Insight, is brilliant, fascinating, enthralling, and filled with insights to help anyone find greater peace and compassion in their lives. The next few blogs will share some of the insights I gained from this story about a neuroscientist experiencing and recovering from a stroke. 

Insight #1 – Emotions precede thought.

Everything we perceive in the world gets judged first by the part of our brains which attaches emotion to experience (i.e., the limbic system). Then and only then do those perceptions travel on to our thinking brains (i.e., the cerebral cortex). So we feel angry, threatened, frustrated, disappointed, or sad before we even know what the stimulus is. Our thinking brains then have to interpret these perceptions in light of our emotional response.

Without this understanding we are left to trust our limbic system. We accept that some negative emotion is appropriate and our cerebral cortex creates thoughts and interpretations that justify the emotion, thus fueling the negative emotion even further.

But those emotions aren’t necessarily appropriate. In fact, our limbic systems never mature. They are wired the same at age 20 or 60 as they are at age 2.

With this knowledge we are given a choice. When negative emotions hit, we can reject them and seek out data or interpretations that evoke positive emotions. We can laugh at the negative emotional response and remind ourselves that it is simply our emotional brain playing tricks on us.

We have the power to choose a different response. We can master our emotional brains.